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Constitution of the United States of America

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Fourth Amendment

Arizona, Constitution of the State of

No person shall be disturbed in his private affairs, or his home invaded, without authority of law.

Article 2, Section 8 (Right to Privacy)

California, Constitution of the State of

All people are by nature free and independent and have inalienable rights. Among these are enjoying and defending life and liberty, acquiring, possessing, and protecting property, and pursuing and obtaining safety, happiness, and privacy.

Article I (Declaration of Rights), Section 1

Florida, Constitution of the State of

Every natural person has the right to be let alone and free from governmental intrusion into the person’s private life except as otherwise provided herein. This section shall not be construed to limit the public’s right of access to public records and meetings as provided by law.

Article I (Declaration of Rights), Section 23 (Right to Privacy

Montana, Constitution of the State of

The right of individual privacy is essential to the well-being of a free society and shall not be infringed without the showing of a compelling state interest.

Article 2 (Declaration of Rights), Section 10 (Right to Privacy)

New Mexico, Constitution of the State of

The people of the state have the sole and exclusive right to govern themselves as a free, sovereign and independent state.

Article 2 (Bill of Rights), Section 3 (Right of Self-Government)

All persons are born equally free, and have certain natural, inherent and inalienable rights, among which are the rights of enjoying and defending life and liberty, of acquiring, possessing and protecting property, and of seeking and obtaining safety and happiness.

Article 2 (Bill of Rights), Section 4 (Inherent Rights)

The people shall be secure in their persons, papers, homes and effects, from unreasonable searches and seizures, and no warrant to search any place, or seize any person or thing, shall issue without describing the place to be searched, or the persons or things to be seized, nor without a written showing of probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation.

Article 2 (Bill of Rights), Section 10 (Searches and Seizures)

New York, Constitution of the State of

No member of this state shall be disfranchised 2, or deprived of any of the rights or privileges secured to any citizen thereof, unless by the law of the land, or the judgment of his or her peers, except that the legislature may provide that there shall be no primary election held to nominate candidates for public office or to elect persons to party positions for any political party or parties in any unit of representation of the state from which such candidates or persons are nominated or elected whenever there is no contest or contests for such nominations or election as may be prescribed by general law. (Amended by vote of the people November 3,1959; November 6, 2001.)3

Article 1: Bill of Rights, Section 1 – Rights, privileges and franchise secured; power of legislature to dispense with primary elections in certain cases

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers andeffects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated,and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath oraffirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.The right of the people to be secure against unreasonable interception oftelephone and telegraph communications shall not be violated, and ex parteorders or warrants shall issue only upon oath or affirmation that there isreasonable ground to believe that evidence of crime may be thus obtained, andidentifying the particular means of communication, and particularlydescribing the person or persons whose communications are to be interceptedand the purpose thereof. (New. Adopted by Constitutional Convention of1938 and approved by vote of the people November 8, 1938.)

Article 1: Bill of Rights, Section 12: Security against unreasonable searches, seizures and interceptions

North Carolina, Constitution of the State of

We hold it to be self-evident that all persons are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, the enjoyment of the fruits of their own labor, and the pursuit of happiness.

Article I: Declaration of Rights, Section 1. The equality and rights of persons

General warrants, whereby any officer or other person may be commanded to search suspected places without evidence of the act committed, or to seize any person or persons not named, whose offense is not particularly described and supported by evidence, are dangerous to liberty and shall not be granted.

Article I: Declaration of Rights, Section 20 – General warrants

North Dakota, Constitution of the State of

All men are born equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, among which are those of enjoying and defending life and liberty, of acquiring and protecting property and the pursuit of happiness. To secure these rights governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.

Article 6: Bill of Rights, Section 1: Inherent rights

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures shall not be violated, and no warrant shall issue but upon probable cause supported by affidavit, particularly describing the place to be searched and the person or thing to be seized.

Article 6: Bill of Rights, Section 11: Search and seizure

Ohio, Constitution of the State of

All men are, by nature, free and independent, and have certain inalienable rights, among which are those of enjoying and defending life and liberty, acquiring, possessing, and protecting property, and seeking and obtaining happiness and safety.

Article 1: Bill of Rights, Section 1: Inalienable rights

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and possessions, against unreasonable searches and seizures shall not be violated; and no warrant shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, particularly describing the place to be searched, and the person and things to be seized.

Article 1: Bill of Rights, Section 14: Search warrants and general warrants

Oregon, Constitution of the State of

We declare that all men, when they form a social compact are equal in right: that all power is inherent in the people, and all free governments are founded on their authority, and instituted for their peace, safety, and happiness; and they have at all times a right to alter, reform, or abolish the government in such manner as they may think proper. —

Article I: Bill of Rights, Section 1 – Natural Rights Inherent in People

No law shall violate the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable search, or seizure; and no warrant shall issue but upon probable cause, supported by oath, or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the person or thing to be seized. —

Article I: Bill of Rights, Section 9 – Unreasonable Seaches or Seizures

Pennsylvania, Constitution of the State of

All men are born equally free and independent, and have certain inherent and indefeasible rights, among which are those of enjoying and defending life and liberty, of acquiring, possessing and protecting property and reputation, and of pursuing their own happiness.

Article 1: Declaration of Rights, Section 1: Inherent rights of mankind

The people shall be secure in their persons, houses, papers and possessions from unreasonable searches and seizures, and no warrant to search any place or to seize any person or things shall issue without describing them as nearly as may be, nor without probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation subscribed to by the affiant.

Article 1: Declaration of Rights, Section 2. Security from searches and seizures.

South Carolina, Constitution of the State of

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects against unreasonable searches and seizures and unreasonable invasions of privacy shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, the person or thing to be seized, and the information to be obtained.

Article 1: Declaration of Rights, Section 10: Searches and seizures; invasions of privacy

South Dakota, Constitution of the State of

All individuals are by nature equally free and independent and have certain inalienable rights, among which are those of enjoying and defending life and liberty; acquiring, possessing and protecting property and reputation; pursuing and obtaining safety and happiness; and to keep and bear arms for the defense of their person, family, property, and the state, and for lawful hunting, recreational, and other lawful purposes, which shall not be infringed.

Article 1: Declaration of Rights, Section 1

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures shall not be violated; and no warrant shall issue but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, particularly describing the place to be searched and the persons and things to be seized.

Article 1: Declaration of Rights, Section 8

Texas, Constitution of the State of

The people shall be secure in their persons, houses, papers and possessions, from all unreasonable seizures or searches, and no warrant to search any place, or to seize any person or thing, shall issue without describing them as near as may be, nor without probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation.

Article 1: Bill of Rights, Section: 9 – Searches and Seizures

No citizen of this State shall be deprived of life, liberty, property, privileges or immunities, or in any manner disfranchised, except by the due course of the law of the land.

Article 1: Bill of Rights, Section 19: Deprivation of Life, Liberty, Property, Etc. by Due Course of Law

Virginia, Constitution of the State of

That all men are by nature equally free and independent and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot, by any compact, deprive or divest their posterity; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety

Article I. Bill of Rights, Section 1. Equality and rights of men

That general warrants, whereby an officer or messenger may be commanded to search suspected places without evidence of a fact committed, or to seize any person or persons not named, or whose offense is not particularly described and supported by evidence, are grievous and oppressive, and ought not to be granted.

Article I. Bill of Rights, Section 10. General warrants of search or seizure prohibited

Washington, Constitution of the State of

No person shall be disturbed in his private affairs, or his home invaded, without authority of law.

Article 1 (Declaration of Rights), Section 7 (Invasion of Private Affairs or Home Prohibited)

International Laws

Right to Privacy – Universal Declaration of Human Rights Article 12

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